Recent Storm Damage Posts

Will Your Roof Hold Up Against A Storm?

4/22/2020 (Permalink)

Everyone knows our cold, snowy, icy winters can wreak havoc on a roof. Our fast and furious spring storms, however, can be just as damaging as the worst blizzard. Spring storms often arrive quickly and with little warning, which forces most homeowners to be reactive - instead of proactive - in many cases. It is extremely important to be proactive and prepare for the strong thunderstorms that will inevitably rip through the area.

While having trees on your property brings a number of benefits, they can also lead to unexpected disasters. Trim trees located near structures. If this is not possible, consider removing or relocating them. Additionally, ensure all drains and gutters are free and clear of debris; clogs can lead to water backing up and flowing into - instead of away from - a structure.

Unfortunately, no amount of preparation can prevent all damage. As such, a thorough inspection after the weather has subsided is always a good idea. Some common issues are:

  • Debris and ponding water
  • Cuts and punctures in membranes
  • Edge metal pulled up
  • Damaged or missing siding
  • Damaged perimeter flashing
  • Damaged or missing shingles
  • Damaged or missing HVAC equipment
  • Cracks or wear on exterior walls
  • Damage to skylights or domes

Winter carries the reputation as a dangerous season for roofs - and deservedly so - but it is very important to not overlook the damage spring storms can cause.

Should you suffer storm damage this Summer, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400!  Let us help you make it "Like it never even happened." 

An Unexpected Snow Storm: What Should I Do?

4/21/2020 (Permalink)

It can come as a shock to see such heavy amounts of snow in the middle of spring. Nevertheless, SERVPRO is prepared as always to respond to its local community to ensure a swift and efficient clean up.

With heavy snow comes broken limbs, and broken limbs lead to downed power lines.

When a snow storm comes in, make sure you do the following

Before

  • Purchase a reliable shovel
  • Purchase batteries in the event of a power outage
  • Purchase salt to deice your walkway and driveway
  • Stock up on fuel if you have a generator
  • Charge your electronics and handheld devices
  • Have a decent supply of non-perishables

During

  • If power is lost make sure to keep your refrigerator closed to lessen the chance of your food spoiling
  • Stay inside
  • Stay warm with blankets and extra layers

After

  • Avoid driving until the roads have been plowed
  • Avoid downed power lines and call your power company to inform them of said lines

Remember, planning is key. Always be prepared!


If there is damage dealt to your home, SERVPRO will be there to help. Contact us at (207)947-0400

Even During Uncertain Times, SERVPRO Is Ready For Storms!

4/17/2020 (Permalink)

As our communities are still focused on the ever-changing situation with the coronavirus, life - and its many curveballs - is still continuing. As we progress further into Spring, a whole new set of seasonal challenges will be upon us.

One of the things the crew at SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth specializes in is storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

On top of that, we have the knowledge and experience to tackle your problem head-on quickly and efficiently.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, reduces the restoration cost, and gets you back into your home sooner.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit the Greater Bangor area, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of over 1,600 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth is a locally-owned company with the power of a national brand behind it to support any size loss.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today (207)947-0400

Blizzards, Home Damage, and You

12/31/2019 (Permalink)

Winter is officially here, which means folks in Maine are eagerly awaiting the next big snow storm. While most people assume the only disruptions blizzards can bring are travel difficulties and requiring quality time with the snowblower, they can actually have a significant affect on your property. Damage to your home caused by blizzards can be severe and difficult to repair. Winter storms and blizzards in Maine can bring about many hazards we need to prepare for.

  • Snow
    • Snow is, of course, typically the primary component to any winter storm. During blizzards, it can accumulate quickly on roofs and other structures associated with your home. If left unattended, this additional weight could compromise the structural integrity of your roof deck. If there are any trees near your home, snow accumulation can potentially result in bringing the trees down on top of your home. In either case, the damage can be significant; the situation is also exacerbated by the colder temperatures during the winter months.
  • Ice
    • Aside from the obvious slipping hazards ice creates, it can also be extremely problematic for your home. Melting caused by the natural insulating properties of snow can result in ice dams, which can lead to significant moisture intrusion into your home. If left undetected or untreated, this moisture intrusion result in a significant mold infestation.
  • Wind
    • Blizzards often bring high winds along to the party, which can easily lead to damage to your home. Aside from the potential for superficial damage, object becoming airborne are projectiles that could easily break windows, or damage siding or shingles; in any case, the end result is intrusion of the outside elements, which can lead to significant problems down the road.

Should you suffer storm damage this Winter, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400!  Let us help you make it "Like it never even happened." 

SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth is ALWAYS Ready for Storms!

7/15/2019 (Permalink)

One of the things the crew at SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth specializes in is storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

On top of that, we have the knowledge and experience to tackle your problem head-on quickly and efficiently.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, reduces the restoration cost, and gets you back into your home sooner.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit the Greater Bangor area, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of over 1,600 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth is a locally-owned company with the power of a national brand behind it to support any size loss.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today (207)947-0400

Tropical Storms and Hurricanes: Tips for Maine Homeowners

7/12/2019 (Permalink)

Tropical Storm and Hurricane season is fast approaching. Although we don't typically see the full brunt of these sorts of storms in Maine, we often catch portions of them every year. Recently, the intensity, severity, and regularity of these storms have seemingly been increasing; as such general preparedness during this part of the year is always a good idea.

Here are a few tips to keep your home and family safe in the event of a Tropical Storm or Hurricane.

  • Leave low lying areas. Flooding is a real possibility with strong storms that generate high levels of rainfall.
  • Protect windows with plywood boards, or storm shutters. Strong winds and flying debris can easily lead to broken windows.
  • Secure outside objects. Unsecured objects can easily become flying debris due to high-force winds.
  • Make sure you have plenty of fuel and water. Power outages can easily occur and - depending upon the severity - can last for hours, days, or even weeks.
  • Have several days supply of food and water for each family member. Extended utility outages could necessitate the need for emergency supplies.
  • If called to evacuate, do so immediately.

While we don't often see the full power of these major storms in Maine, it's always a good idea to be prepared.

Should you suffer storm damage this Summer, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400!  Let us help you make it "Like it never even happened." 

SERVPRO is Always Ready for Flood Season

6/13/2019 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit the Greater Bangor area, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of over 1,600 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today (207)947-0400

After A Flood: What To Do When Returning To Your Home

6/11/2019 (Permalink)

Floods can be extremely devastating, both to your property and mental well-being.  It can be tempting to immediately rush back into your home after the water finally recedes, but there are a number of factors that need to be considered first. A post-flood home can feature a variety of potential hazards that should be considered prior to reentry.

Gas Leaks

When first entering your home, be sure to open the doors and windows to ventilate the structure and help remove foul odors or leaking gas. Do not turn on any of the house’s lighting; instead, use a flashlight as you’re moving throughout the structure. Open flames, electrical sparks and cigarettes can cause an explosive fire if there is a gas leak. Should you discover a leak, immediately exit your home and contact your service company for assistance.

Electrical Hazards

After a severe flood, there will likely be damage to a house’s electrical system. Avoid turning on lights or operating electrical appliances. Ensure the electricity is turned off at the main panel before checking an individual circuits or equipment. If your basement is flooded, the utility company will need to disconnect the power from your house. If you absolutely must work on live circuits, don’t rely on basic rubber gloves or rubber soled footwear to protect you; only properly rated equipment is sufficient for use around electricity.

Structural Damage

Watch for falling debris and check for possible damage to floors and walls. Knock down any hanging plaster. If you are not sure of the dangers the structural damage presents, call the city building inspector or engineer.

There is a danger of foundation walls collapsing, especially if the basement is flooded. Keep an eye on the foundation walls as the water is removed. This causes a change in pressure and could cause the walls to cave in. To prevent radical changes in pressure, pump about a third of the water out each day. The water pressure needs a chance to equalize.

Drinking Water, Food Safety

Supplies from any source suspected of being affected by flood conditions may be treated by one of the following methods:

  • Mix teaspoonful of commercial laundry bleach with 2 gallons of water. Let stand five minutes before drinking.
  • Bring water to a boil for ten minutes in a clean container. Eliminate the flat taste by shaking the water in a bottle, by pouring from one container to another, or by adding a pinch of salt. If the water is from a public supply, local authorities will tell you if boiling is necessary.
  • Add five drops of tincture of iodine solution to one quart of water. Mix thoroughly and allow to stand for 30 minutes before drinking.
  • Use water purifying tablets, available in drug stores or camping equipment outlets.

Do not use fresh food that has come into contact with flood waters; it will likely be contaminated with any number of infectious agents.

Although we can't prevent floods from happening, we can certainly help with the cleanup and restoration after the waters have receded. When in need, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400; we're always here to help!

What To Do During Hurricane Season In Maine

6/6/2019 (Permalink)

Tropical Storm and Hurricane season is fast approaching. Although we don't typically see the full brunt of these sorts of storms in Maine, we often catch portions of them every year. Recently, the intensity, severity, and regularity of these storms have seemingly been increasing; as such general preparedness during this part of the year is always a good idea.

Here are a few tips to keep your home and family safe in the event of a Tropical Storm or Hurricane.

  • Leave low lying areas. Flooding is a real possibility with strong storms that generate high levels of rainfall.
  • Protect windows with plywood boards, or storm shutters. Strong winds and flying debris can easily lead to broken windows.
  • Secure outside objects. Unsecured objects can easily become flying debris due to high-force winds.
  • Make sure you have plenty of fuel and water. Power outages can easily occur and - depending upon the severity - can last for hours, days, or even weeks.
  • Have several days supply of food and water for each family member. Extended utility outages could necessitate the need for emergency supplies.
  • If called to evacuate, do so immediately.

While we don't often see the full power of these major storms in Maine, it's always a good idea to be prepared.

Should you suffer storm damage this Summer, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400!  Let us help you make it "Like it never even happened." 

Will Your Roof Stand Up to a Summer Storm?

5/15/2019 (Permalink)

Everyone knows our cold, snowy, icy winters can wreak havoc on a roof. Our fast and furious summer storms, however, can be just as damaging as the worst blizzards. Summer storms often arrive quickly and with little warning, which forces most homeowners to be reactive in many cases. It is extremely important to be proactive and prepare or the strong thunderstorms that will inevitably rip through the area.

While having trees on your property brings a number of benefits, they can also lead to unexpected disasters. Trim trees located near structures. If this is not possible, consider removing or relocating them. Additionally, ensure all drains and gutters are free and clear of debris; clogs can lead to water backing up and flowing into - instead of away from - a structure.

Unfortunately, no amount of preparation can prevent all damage. As such, a thorough inspection after the weather has subsided is always a good idea. Some common issues are:

  • Debris and ponding water
  • Cuts and punctures in membranes
  • Edge metal pulled up
  • Damaged or missing siding
  • Damaged perimeter flashing
  • Damaged or missing shingles
  • Damaged or missing HVAC equipment
  • Cracks or wear on exterior walls
  • Damage to skylights or domes

Winter may deservedly carry the reputation as a dangerous season for roofs, it is important to not overlook the damage summer storms can cause.

Should you suffer storm damage this Summer, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400!  Let us help you make it "Like it never even happened." 

How to Prepare for Tornadoes in Maine

5/6/2019 (Permalink)

Tornadoes are nature's most violent storm. By definition, a tornado is a violently rotating column of air that extends from the base of the thunderstorm cloud to the ground. While they are rare in Maine when compared to other parts of the country, they can still form and be quite dangerous.

Prior to the development of a tornado, a thunderstorm typically begins to rotate. As this rotation becomes stronger, the chance that a tornado may develop also increases. Although the National Weather Service's Doppler Radar generally can not see the actual tornado, the Radar does detect rotation of the thunderstorm cloud; this gives some indication of the possibility that a tornado may be forming or has formed.

The scale used to measure tornado damage is the Enhanced Fujita scale, commonly referred to as the E-F scale. Based on scientific studies of tornado damage, the original Fujita scale was modified and the new "Enhanced Fujita Scale" was officially implemented in 2007.

  • EF-0 - Light damage (winds 65 to 85 mph)
  • EF-1 - Moderate damage (winds 86 to 110 mph)
  • EF-2 - Considerable damage (winds 111 to 135 mph)
  • EF-3 - Severe damage (winds 136 to 165 mph)
  • EF-4 - Devastating damage (winds 166 to 200 mph)
  • EF-5 - Incredible damage (winds over 200 mph)

Tornadoes and Maine:

Peak tornado activity in northern New England occurs between June and August, but tornadoes have occurred as early as May and as late as November. Most tornadoes occur between 3 and 9 pm and have an average forward speed of about 30 mph. For the 40 year period between 1950 and 1990, 74 tornadoes occurred in Maine. This is an average of about 2 tornadoes per year. During 2016 one tornado touched down in Maine.

Due to the usual short life-span of tornadoes in northern New England, there is often little, if any, advance warning.
Tornadoes in New England generally touch down and then lift off the ground very quickly. Many of the tornadoes that have occurred in the past, have occurred while severe thunderstorm warnings have been in effect. If you hear that a severe thunderstorm warning is in effect for your area, be alert for the possibility of a tornado. A low rotating cloud, large hail, and/or a load roar are all signs that may precede the touchdown of a tornado.

Here are some tornado facts and safety tips:

  • Flying debris causes most deaths and injuries in tornadoes
  • The safest place in your home during a tornado is your basement.
  • Stay away from windows.
  • Get out of vehicles or mobile homes, they offer little protection. Seek shelter in a substantial building.
  • Do NOT seek shelter under a bridge overpass. Bridge overpasses offer little, if any, protection from wind- driven debris.

Although we can't stop tornadoes or severe storm damage, we can certainly help with the cleanup and restoration after everything has calmed down. When in need, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400; we're always here to help!

We're Always Ready For Storms!

4/8/2019 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit the Greater Bangor area, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of over 1,600 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today (207)947-0400

What Should You Do After A Flood?

4/2/2019 (Permalink)

Floods can be extremely devastating, both to your property and mental well-being.  It can be tempting to immediately rush back into your home after the water finally recedes, but there are a number of factors that need to be considered first. A post-flood home can feature a variety of potential hazards that should be considered prior to reentry.

Gas Leaks

When first entering your home, be sure to open the doors and windows to ventilate the structure and help remove foul odors or leaking gas. Do not turn on any of the house’s lighting; instead, use a flashlight as you’re moving throughout the structure. Open flames, electrical sparks and cigarettes can cause an explosive fire if there is a gas leak. Should you discover a leak, immediately exit your home and contact your service company for assistance.

Electrical Hazards

After a severe flood, there will likely be damage to a house’s electrical system. Avoid turning on lights or operating electrical appliances. Ensure the electricity is turned off at the main panel before checking an individual circuits or equipment. If your basement is flooded, the utility company will need to disconnect the power from your house. If you absolutely must work on live circuits, don’t rely on basic rubber gloves or rubber soled footwear to protect you; only properly rated equipment is sufficient for use around electricity.

Structural Damage

Watch for falling debris and check for possible damage to floors and walls. Knock down any hanging plaster. If you are not sure of the dangers the structural damage presents, call the city building inspector or engineer.

There is a danger of foundation walls collapsing, especially if the basement is flooded. Keep an eye on the foundation walls as the water is removed. This causes a change in pressure and could cause the walls to cave in. To prevent radical changes in pressure, pump about a third of the water out each day. The water pressure needs a chance to equalize.

Drinking Water, Food Safety

Supplies from any source suspected of being affected by flood conditions may be treated by one of the following methods:

  • Mix teaspoonful of commercial laundry bleach with 2 gallons of water. Let stand five minutes before drinking.
  • Bring water to a boil for ten minutes in a clean container. Eliminate the flat taste by shaking the water in a bottle, by pouring from one container to another, or by adding a pinch of salt. If the water is from a public supply, local authorities will tell you if boiling is necessary.
  • Add five drops of tincture of iodine solution to one quart of water. Mix thoroughly and allow to stand for 30 minutes before drinking.
  • Use water purifying tablets, available in drug stores or camping equipment outlets.

Do not use fresh food that has come into contact with flood waters; it will likely be contaminated with any number of infectious agents.

Although we can't prevent floods from happening, we can certainly help with the cleanup and restoration after the waters have receded. When in need, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400; we're always here to help!

Tropical Storm and Hurricane Safety Tips for Maine

7/30/2018 (Permalink)

Tropical Storm and Hurricane season is fast approaching. Although we don't typically see the full brunt of these sorts of storms in Maine, we often catch portions of them every year. Recently, the intensity, severity, and regularity of these storms have seemingly been increasing; as such general preparedness during this part of the year is always a good idea.

Here are a few tips to keep your home and family safe in the event of a Tropical Storm or Hurricane.

  • Leave low lying areas. Flooding is a real possibility with strong storms that generate high levels of rainfall.
  • Protect windows with plywood boards, or storm shutters. Strong winds and flying debris can easily lead to broken windows.
  • Secure outside objects. Unsecured objects can easily become flying debris due to high-force winds.
  • Make sure you have plenty of fuel and water. Power outages can easily occur and - depending upon the severity - can last for hours, days, or even weeks.
  • Have several days supply of food and water for each family member. Extended utility outages could necessitate the need for emergency supplies.
  • If called to evacuate, do so immediately.

While we don't often see the full power of these major storms in Maine, it's always a good idea to be prepared.

Should you suffer storm damage this Summer, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400!  Let us help you make it "Like it never even happened." 

Returning to Your Home After a Flood

6/12/2018 (Permalink)

Floods can be extremely devastating, both to your property and mental well-being.  It can be tempting to immediately rush back into your home after the water finally recedes, but there are a number of factors that need to be considered first. A post-flood home can feature a variety of potential hazards that should be considered prior to reentry.

Gas Leaks

When first entering your home, be sure to open the doors and windows to ventilate the structure and help remove foul odors or leaking gas. Do not turn on any of the house’s lighting; instead, use a flashlight as you’re moving throughout the structure. Open flames, electrical sparks and cigarettes can cause an explosive fire if there is a gas leak. Should you discover a leak, immediately exit your home and contact your service company for assistance.

Electrical Hazards

After a severe flood, there will likely be damage to a house’s electrical system. Avoid turning on lights or operating electrical appliances. Ensure the electricity is turned off at the main panel before checking an individual circuits or equipment. If your basement is flooded, the utility company will need to disconnect the power from your house. If you absolutely must work on live circuits, don’t rely on basic rubber gloves or rubber soled footwear to protect you; only properly rated equipment is sufficient for use around electricity.

Structural Damage

Watch for falling debris and check for possible damage to floors and walls. Knock down any hanging plaster. If you are not sure of the dangers the structural damage presents, call the city building inspector or engineer.

There is a danger of foundation walls collapsing, especially if the basement is flooded. Keep an eye on the foundation walls as the water is removed. This causes a change in pressure and could cause the walls to cave in. To prevent radical changes in pressure, pump about a third of the water out each day. The water pressure needs a chance to equalize.

Drinking Water, Food Safety

Supplies from any source suspected of being affected by flood conditions may be treated by one of the following methods:

  • Mix teaspoonful of commercial laundry bleach with 2 gallons of water. Let stand five minutes before drinking.
  • Bring water to a boil for ten minutes in a clean container. Eliminate the flat taste by shaking the water in a bottle, by pouring from one container to another, or by adding a pinch of salt. If the water is from a public supply, local authorities will tell you if boiling is necessary.
  • Add five drops of tincture of iodine solution to one quart of water. Mix thoroughly and allow to stand for 30 minutes before drinking.
  • Use water purifying tablets, available in drug stores or camping equipment outlets.

Do not use fresh food that has come into contact with flood waters; it will likely be contaminated with any number of infectious agents.

Although we can't prevent floods from happening, we can certainly help with the cleanup and restoration after the waters have receded. When in need, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400; we're always here to help!

Can Your Roof Handle a Summer Storm?

6/7/2018 (Permalink)

Everyone knows our cold, snowy, icy winters can wreak havoc on a roof. Our fast and furious summer storms, however, can be just as damaging as the worst blizzards. Summer storms often arrive quickly and with little warning, which forces most homeowners to be reactive in many cases. It is extremely important to be proactive and prepare or the strong thunderstorms that will inevitably rip through the area.

While having trees on your property brings a number of benefits, they can also lead to unexpected disasters. Trim trees located near structures. If this is not possible, consider removing or relocating them. Additionally, ensure all drains and gutters are free and clear of debris; clogs can lead to water backing up and flowing into - instead of away from - a structure.

Unfortunately, no amount of preparation can prevent all damage. As such, a thorough inspection after the weather has subsided is always a good idea. Some common issues are:

  • Debris and ponding water
  • Cuts and punctures in membranes
  • Edge metal pulled up
  • Damaged or missing siding
  • Damaged perimeter flashing
  • Damaged or missing shingles
  • Damaged or missing HVAC equipment
  • Cracks or wear on exterior walls
  • Damage to skylights or domes

Winter may deservedly carry the reputation as a dangerous season for roofs, it is important to not overlook the damage summer storms can cause.

Should you suffer storm damage this Summer, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400!  Let us help you make it "Like it never even happened." 

SERVPRO is Ready for Floods

6/1/2018 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit the Greater Bangor area, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of over 1,600 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today (207)947-0400

Your Home and Lightning Storms

5/8/2018 (Permalink)

Although houses and other substantial building offer the best protection from lightning, each year many homes across the United States are struck by lightning. In fact, on average, lightning causes about 4400 house fires and 1800 other structural fires each year, some of which are deadly. All totaled, lightning causes nearly $1 billion in damages each year.

There are three main ways lightning enters homes and buildings: (1) a direct strike, (2) through wires or pipes that extend outside the structure, and (3) through the ground. Regardless of the method of entrance, once in a structure, the lightning can travel through the electrical and phone wires, the plumbing, and/or radio and television reception systems.

Indoor safety depends on avoiding contact with items that could conduct lightning within the home. Here are some indoor safety tips to follow when a thunderstorm is in the area.

  1. Don't touch electrical equipment or cords. If you plan to unplug any electronic equipment, do so WELL BEFORE the storm arrives.

  2. Stay off corded phones.

  3. Avoid contact with plumbing. Do not wash your hands, take a shower, wash dishes, or do laundry.

  4. Stay away from windows and doors, and stay off porches.

Should you suffer storm damage this Summer, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400!  Let us help you make it "Like it never even happened."

Preparing for Tornadoes in Maine

5/1/2018 (Permalink)

Tornadoes are nature's most violent storm. By definition, a tornado is a violently rotating column of air that extends from the base of the thunderstorm cloud to the ground. While they are rare in Maine when compared to other parts of the country, they can still form and be quite dangerous.

Prior to the development of a tornado, a thunderstorm typically begins to rotate. As this rotation becomes stronger, the chance that a tornado may develop also increases. Although the National Weather Service's Doppler Radar generally can not see the actual tornado, the Radar does detect rotation of the thunderstorm cloud; this gives some indication of the possibility that a tornado may be forming or has formed.

The scale used to measure tornado damage is the Enhanced Fujita scale, commonly referred to as the E-F scale. Based on scientific studies of tornado damage, the original Fujita scale was modified and the new "Enhanced Fujita Scale" was officially implemented in 2007.

  • EF-0 - Light damage (winds 65 to 85 mph)
  • EF-1 - Moderate damage (winds 86 to 110 mph)
  • EF-2 - Considerable damage (winds 111 to 135 mph)
  • EF-3 - Severe damage (winds 136 to 165 mph)
  • EF-4 - Devastating damage (winds 166 to 200 mph)
  • EF-5 - Incredible damage (winds over 200 mph)

Tornadoes and Maine:

Peak tornado activity in northern New England occurs between June and August, but tornadoes have occurred as early as May and as late as November. Most tornadoes occur between 3 and 9 pm and have an average forward speed of about 30 mph. For the 40 year period between 1950 and 1990, 74 tornadoes occurred in Maine. This is an average of about 2 tornadoes per year. During 2016 one tornado touched down in Maine.

Due to the usual short life-span of tornadoes in northern New England, there is often little, if any, advance warning.
Tornadoes in New England generally touch down and then lift off the ground very quickly. Many of the tornadoes that have occurred in the past, have occurred while severe thunderstorm warnings have been in effect. If you hear that a severe thunderstorm warning is in effect for your area, be alert for the possibility of a tornado. A low rotating cloud, large hail, and/or a load roar are all signs that may precede the touchdown of a tornado.

Here are some tornado facts and safety tips:

  • Flying debris causes most deaths and injuries in tornadoes
  • The safest place in your home during a tornado is your basement.
  • Stay away from windows.
  • Get out of vehicles or mobile homes, they offer little protection. Seek shelter in a substantial building.
  • Do NOT seek shelter under a bridge overpass. Bridge overpasses offer little, if any, protection from wind- driven debris.

Although we can't stop tornadoes or severe storm damage, we can certainly help with the cleanup and restoration after everything has calmed down. When in need, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400; we're always here to help!

SERVPRO is Ready for Storms in Bangor!

4/9/2018 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit the Greater Bangor area, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of over 1,600 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today (207)947-0400

Maine Flood Safety

4/2/2018 (Permalink)

Typically, when seasonal flooding occurs in Maine, we usually have some advance notice and the National Weather Service issues flood watches and warnings. It gives us time to prepare and, if necessary, evacuate an affected area.

Flash floods, however, are quite a bit different; they can happen whenever we get too much rain in a small period of time, at any point during a year. Warnings are issued, but there may be little or no advance notice and flood waters can rapidly move into an area.

Flood Facts:

  • A car or small truck will float in as little as two feet of water. If your vehicle begins to float, you lose control over the vehicle. If your vehicle stalls in a flooded roadway, abandon it immediately and seek higher ground. The water may sweep the vehicle and its occupants away.
  • Nearly half of all flash flood fatalities are vehicle related.

Flood Fatalities in Maine

  • In 1996, heavy rain caused serious flooding in New Hampshire and western Maine. A Scarborough, Maine man drowned when he drove his car into a flooded roadway where the road had washed away.
  • In 2004, a man died in Gardiner when attempting to kayak in a swollen stream. Rushing flood water may look exciting to the amateur canoeist or boater, but it has incredible power and may be carrying hidden debris.
  • In 2007, a woman and her little granddaughter in Limerick were swept away when they tried to walk through flood water.
  • In 2012, a Milo man was killed when he drove into a washed-out section of road.

Safety Tips:

  • Never drive a car into a flooded roadway as the road underneath may be washed out.
  • Stay clear of streams during heavy rainfall events. Swiftly moving water is extremely powerful and can easily overpower a person.
  • Do not attempt recreational boating in flood water. The current can be powerful and there may be heavy debris swept along in the water, making it extremely dangerous.
  • Keep children and pets inside and away from flooded streets, culverts, and streams.
  • Report flooding to the appropriate authorities.
  • Obey road blocks and barriers, even if the flooding has receded. Flood waters may have undercut the road surface or left dangerous debris in the roadway.
  • If you live in a flood prone area, have a plan in case the water starts rising quickly.
  • Know your evacuation route and if advised to evacuate do so immediately.

Although we can't stop the flood waters, we can certainly help with the cleanup and restoration after the waters have receded. When in need, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400; we're always here to help!

Winter Storms: Prepare Your Home For The Worst

12/5/2017 (Permalink)

Surviving a winter storm involves more than just having shovels on hand while making sure the cupboards are stocked with bread and milk. It’s about fixing potential winter or blizzard to your home or possibly preventing it from happening at all.

Here are some cost-saving tips you can rely on when preparing for the next storm.

1. Look for Nearby Trees

Trees are a leading cause of incidental home damage during a storm. Limbs are torn by gusting winds or excessive snow weight and driven onto roofs and into siding. Inspect surrounding or neighboring trees in the fall. Significant tree service is best left to professionals.

2. Examine Your Roof

Roofs are the most vulnerable part of a home during a harsh winter storm. Roof areas typically account for half of the structure's exposed area and are often one of the most expensive areas to repair. Examining and making immediate repairs to your roof right after a storm can save thousands of dollars in collateral damage from leaks and water damage.

3. Check Your Ventilation

Ventilation openings in your home are easily damaged in a winter storm. Fireplace and chimney flues should be checked for blockage before finding out after lighting a fire. HVAC intakes and exhausts are easily clogged by blown leaves or icy buildup. 

4. Take Winter Water Damage Seriously

Deal with water damage immediately: Stop the source, protect valuables and begin drainage and drying. Make sure you contact your insurance company immediately and always consider hiring a water damage restoration company.

When in need, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400; we're always here to help!

Lightning Storms and Your Home

7/11/2017 (Permalink)

Lightning is extremely dangerous and causes numerous structural fires across the country every year.

Although houses and other substantial building offer the best protection from lightning, each year many homes across the United States are struck by lightning. In fact, on average, lightning causes about 4400 house fires and 1800 other structural fires each year, some of which are deadly. All totaled, lightning causes nearly $1 billion in damages each year.

There are three main ways lightning enters homes and buildings: (1) a direct strike, (2) through wires or pipes that extend outside the structure, and (3) through the ground. Regardless of the method of entrance, once in a structure, the lightning can travel through the electrical and phone wires, the plumbing, and/or radio and television reception systems.

Indoor safety depends on avoiding contact with items that could conduct lightning within the home. Here are some indoor safety tips to follow when a thunderstorm is in the area.

  1. Don't touch electrical equipment or cords. If you plan to unplug any electronic equipment, do so WELL BEFORE the storm arrives.

  2. Stay off corded phones.

  3. Avoid contact with plumbing. Do not wash your hands, take a shower, wash dishes, or do laundry.

  4. Stay away from windows and doors, and stay off porches.

Should you suffer storm damage this Summer, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400!  Let us help you make it "Like it never even happened."

Tornado Preparedness in Maine

7/7/2017 (Permalink)

Tornadoes are fairly rare in Maine, but they can still form and cause extensive damage.

Tornadoes are nature's most violent storm. By definition, a tornado is a violently rotating column of air that extends from the base of the thunderstorm cloud to the ground. While they are rare in Maine when compared to other parts of the country, they can still form and be quite dangerous.

Prior to the development of a tornado, a thunderstorm typically begins to rotate. As this rotation becomes stronger, the chance that a tornado may develop also increases. Although the National Weather Service's Doppler Radar generally can not see the actual tornado, the Radar does detect rotation of the thunderstorm cloud; this gives some indication of the possibility that a tornado may be forming or has formed.

The scale used to measure tornado damage is the Enhanced Fujita scale, commonly referred to as the E-F scale. Based on scientific studies of tornado damage, the original Fujita scale was modified and the new "Enhanced Fujita Scale" was officially implemented in 2007.

  • EF-0 - Light damage (winds 65 to 85 mph)
  • EF-1 - Moderate damage (winds 86 to 110 mph)
  • EF-2 - Considerable damage (winds 111 to 135 mph)
  • EF-3 - Severe damage (winds 136 to 165 mph)
  • EF-4 - Devastating damage (winds 166 to 200 mph)
  • EF-5 - Incredible damage (winds over 200 mph)

Tornadoes and Maine:

Peak tornado activity in northern New England occurs between June and August, but tornadoes have occurred as early as May and as late as November. Most tornadoes occur between 3 and 9 pm and have an average forward speed of about 30 mph. For the 40 year period between 1950 and 1990, 74 tornadoes occurred in Maine. This is an average of about 2 tornadoes per year. During 2016 one tornado touched down in Maine.

Due to the usual short life-span of tornadoes in northern New England, there is often little, if any, advance warning.
Tornadoes in New England generally touch down and then lift off the ground very quickly. Many of the tornadoes that have occurred in the past, have occurred while severe thunderstorm warnings have been in effect. If you hear that a severe thunderstorm warning is in effect for your area, be alert for the possibility of a tornado. A low rotating cloud, large hail, and/or a load roar are all signs that may precede the touchdown of a tornado.

Here are some tornado facts and safety tips:

  • Flying debris causes most deaths and injuries in tornadoes
  • The safest place in your home during a tornado is your basement.
  • Stay away from windows.
  • Get out of vehicles or mobile homes, they offer little protection. Seek shelter in a substantial building.
  • Do NOT seek shelter under a bridge overpass. Bridge overpasses offer little, if any, protection from wind- driven debris.

Although we can't stop tornadoes or severe storm damage, we can certainly help with the cleanup and restoration after everything has calmed down. When in need, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400; we're always here to help!

Flood and Flash Flood Safety

5/1/2017 (Permalink)

We can't prevent a flood from happening, but we'll be here to restore your home of business afterward!

Typically, when seasonal flooding occurs in Maine, we usually have some advance notice and the National Weather Service issues flood watches and warnings. It gives us time to prepare and, if necessary, evacuate an affected area.

Flash floods, however, are quite a bit different; they can happen whenever we get too much rain in a small period of time, at any point during a year. Warnings are issued, but there may be little or no advance notice and flood waters can rapidly move into an area.

Flood Facts:

  • A car or small truck will float in as little as two feet of water. If your vehicle begins to float, you lose control over the vehicle. If your vehicle stalls in a flooded roadway, abandon it immediately and seek higher ground. The water may sweep the vehicle and its occupants away.
  • Nearly half of all flash flood fatalities are vehicle related.

Flood Fatalities in Maine

  • In 1996, heavy rain caused serious flooding in New Hampshire and western Maine. A Scarborough, Maine man drowned when he drove his car into a flooded roadway where the road had washed away.
  • In 2004, a man died in Gardiner when attempting to kayak in a swollen stream. Rushing flood water may look exciting to the amateur canoeist or boater, but it has incredible power and may be carrying hidden debris.
  • In 2007, a woman and her little granddaughter in Limerick were swept away when they tried to walk through flood water.
  • In 2012, a Milo man was killed when he drove into a washed-out section of road.

Safety Tips:

  • Never drive a car into a flooded roadway as the road underneath may be washed out.
  • Stay clear of streams during heavy rainfall events. Swiftly moving water is extremely powerful and can easily overpower a person.
  • Do not attempt recreational boating in flood water. The current can be powerful and there may be heavy debris swept along in the water, making it extremely dangerous.
  • Keep children and pets inside and away from flooded streets, culverts, and streams.
  • Report flooding to the appropriate authorities.
  • Obey road blocks and barriers, even if the flooding has receded. Flood waters may have undercut the road surface or left dangerous debris in the roadway.
  • If you live in a flood prone area, have a plan in case the water starts rising quickly.
  • Know your evacuation route and if advised to evacuate do so immediately.

Although we can't stop the flood waters, we can certainly help with the cleanup and restoration after the waters have receded. When in need, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400; we're always here to help!

When Storms or Floods hit Bangor, SERVPRO is ready!

4/28/2017 (Permalink)

When storms bring flood waters to your home, SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth is here to make it "Like it never even happened."

SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.


Faster Response


Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.


Resources to Handle Floods and Storms


When storms hit the Greater Bangor area, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of over 1,600 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.


Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today (207)947-0400

Floods: Returning to Your Home

4/12/2017 (Permalink)

Always use caution when reentering a flooded home; there are any number of potentially hazardous situations awaiting inside.

Floods can be extremely devastating, both to your property and mental well-being.  It can be tempting to immediately rush back into your home after the water finally recedes, but there are a number of factors that need to be considered first. A post-flood home can feature a variety of potential hazards that should be considered prior to reentry.

Gas Leaks

When first entering your home, be sure to open the doors and windows to ventilate the structure and help remove foul odors or leaking gas. Do not turn on any of the house’s lighting; instead, use a flashlight as you’re moving throughout the structure. Open flames, electrical sparks and cigarettes can cause an explosive fire if there is a gas leak. Should you discover a leak, immediately exit your home and contact your service company for assistance.

Electrical Hazards

After a severe flood, there will likely be damage to a house’s electrical system. Avoid turning on lights or operating electrical appliances. Ensure the electricity is turned off at the main panel before checking an individual circuits or equipment. If your basement is flooded, the utility company will need to disconnect the power from your house. If you absolutely must work on live circuits, don’t rely on basic rubber gloves or rubber soled footwear to protect you; only properly rated equipment is sufficient for use around electricity.

Structural Damage

Watch for falling debris and check for possible damage to floors and walls. Knock down any hanging plaster. If you are not sure of the dangers the structural damage presents, call the city building inspector or engineer.

There is a danger of foundation walls collapsing, especially if the basement is flooded. Keep an eye on the foundation walls as the water is removed. This causes a change in pressure and could cause the walls to cave in. To prevent radical changes in pressure, pump about a third of the water out each day. The water pressure needs a chance to equalize.

Drinking Water, Food Safety

Supplies from any source suspected of being affected by flood conditions may be treated by one of the following methods:

  • Mix teaspoonful of commercial laundry bleach with 2 gallons of water. Let stand five minutes before drinking.
  • Bring water to a boil for ten minutes in a clean container. Eliminate the flat taste by shaking the water in a bottle, by pouring from one container to another, or by adding a pinch of salt. If the water is from a public supply, local authorities will tell you if boiling is necessary.
  • Add five drops of tincture of iodine solution to one quart of water. Mix thoroughly and allow to stand for 30 minutes before drinking.
  • Use water purifying tablets, available in drug stores or camping equipment outlets.

Do not use fresh food that has come into contact with flood waters; it will likely be contaminated with any number of infectious agents.

Although we can't prevent floods from happening, we can certainly help with the cleanup and restoration after the waters have receded. When in need, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400; we're always here to help!

Flood Preparedness in Maine

4/4/2017 (Permalink)

loods are the most common natural disaster in Maine. Just a few inches of water can cause thousands of dollars worth of damage.

To most of us in Maine, "Spring" is synonymous with "Mud Season"...but, it should also be called "Flood Season", as well.

One of the most common natural disasters in Maine is flooding; they most often occur in March and April, when the snow pack is most subject to natural variables, such as rapidly increasing temperatures and heavier rainfall. Realistically, they can occur any time of the year.

Typically, we see flooding in Maine because of heavy rain, hurricanes, tropical storms, quickly melting snow, ice jams, dam breaches and seasonal storms.

Many flood-related deaths and injuries are caused by fast-moving water and in many cases could be avoided. The National Weather Service advises anyone who approaches a flooded area to Turn Around, Don’t Drown.™ As little as six inches of fast-moving water can knock over an adult and only a few feet can carry a vehicle away.

To protect your home or business from flood damage and loss:

  • Be aware of hazards that can increase the potential for flooding – including flash flooding.
  • Know the flood prone areas in your community - including dam locations.
  • Have a family evacuation/communications plan.
  • Know where and how to seek shelter in the event of evacuation.
  • Check with your insurance agent about flood insurance coverage; most homeowners insurance does not cover floods. Your agent should be able to help you secure insurance through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).
  • Take steps to “flood proof” your home, such as elevating electronics, appliances and furniture, building a dam of sandbags, unplugging electronics and equipment and varnishing wood doors and floors.
  • During the flood stay tuned to radio or TV to get the latest information or monitor a NOAA Weather radio.
  • Pay attention to evacuation orders.
  • Do not camp or park your vehicle along streams or areas at risk of flooding.
  • DO NOT DRIVE ON FLOODED ROADWAYS or cross flowing streams, as the road underneath may be washed out.
  • Be cautious when driving at night as it may be more difficult to recognize flood dangers.

Although we can't prevent floods from happening, we can certainly help with the cleanup and restoration after the waters have receded. When in need, contact SERVPRO of Bangor/Ellsworth at (207)947-0400; we're always here to help!